Dogs in the News Fetching you all the latest canine headlines
  • scissors
    March 21st, 2016Laura P (Editor)Crufts 2016

    Tags: , ,
  • scissors
    March 11th, 2016Laura P (Editor)Crufts 2016

    It was a very busy second day at Crufts 2016. Photos will be soon be available via our Facebook page, but here’s a rundown of the highlights and key headlines so far. Don’t forget that you can watch all the Day 3 action live here, or follow us on Twitter for updates direct from the show.

    Vulnerable Native Breeds

    The Vulnerable Native Breeds represented in the Gundog Group, and their respective Best of Breeds were:

    Clumber Spaniel (70 entries) – TOTUS TUUS KAPRYS REJENTA
    Curly Coated Retriever (76) – ELKYSAR ALL THAT JAZZ
    English Setter (200) – SH CH MARIGLEN SNOWDRIFT AT HAYWORTH
    Field Spaniel (54)  – SH CH NADAVIN NOBILITY JW
    Gordon Setter (192) – SH CH LOURDACE FULCRUM JW
    Irish Red & White Setter (78) – CASAFELICE CHEVIOT
    Irish Water Spaniel (30) – CH/AM CH WHISTLESTOP’S ELEMENTS OF MAGIC
    Sussex Spaniel (52) – SH CH JUBILWELL BEAST OF BODMIN AT VOBROOK

    Today was also the Final of the Kennel Club & Our Dogs Vulnerable British & Irish Breeds competition, judged by Ronnie Irving in the Main Arena prior to the Gundog Group. We are delighted to report that the Gordon Setter, SH CH LOURDACE FULCRUM JW won BOTH competitions! What a fabulous result for both this individual dog and for the Vulnerable Native Breeds as a whole.

    The Reserve prize for the Vulnerable Native Breeds competition went to the Cardigan Corgi Ch Joseter Mr Blobby. 3rd was the Glenn of Imaal Ch Romainville Billy Whizz and 4th was the Field Spaniel Ch Elgert R’Anna. Shortlisted were the Bloodhound, Smooth Collie, Skye Terrier and Irish Water Spaniel. A full list of all the dogs who participated in this competition can be found here.

    Video – Vulnerable Native Breeds Final
    Photos from the final can be found here and here

    Finally, an Irish Water Spaniel represented the working native breeds in the ever popular Gundog display.

    Gundog Group

    The Gundog Group, as detailed above, was won by James the Gordon Setter, from Fife. Unfortunately, the press picked up a story about fellow exhibitors grumbling because the judge who put him forward was the sister of one of the Gordon’s co-owners, but the Kennel Club have stated that no rules were broken in this case.

    It was also a successful day for the Valentisimo kennel, who were present at the show despite their recent headline grabbing tragedy, with Best of Breed, Reserve Best Dog and Best Opposite all going home with them this evening, as well as multiple smaller successes in the classes. The Spanish Water Dog Best of Breed unfortunately wasn’t shortlisted in the Group, but they probably wouldn’t have had room in the car for any more awards!

    Reserve in the Gundog Group was the Chesapeake Bay Retriever SH CH ARNAC BAY EXE. 3rd was the Lagotto Romagnolo IT/NL/SLO/BE/FIN/SE/VDH/LUX CH GLESKA GOODY-GOODY and 4th was the Flatcoat Retriever CH/SEU(U)CH/NOU CH CASTLEROCK SIMPLY MAGIC.

    The Top Gundog 2015, Pointer SH CH SHARNPHILLY JUICI COTURE, won the Bitch Challenge Certificate. The Weimaraner SH CH GUNALT DE ICE AT STRIDVIEW, joint 10th 2015, won Best of Breed. Top Puppy 2015, the Labrador MATTAND EXODUS JW won the Reserve dog CC.

    There are no High Profile breeds in the Gundog Group.

    Video
    Gundog Group Judging & Presentation
    Winner’s Interview
    Behind the Scenes

    Other

    BASC launches new social media account ahead of Crufts showcase
    Docked and Denied takes its campaign to Crufts
    Retired gamekeeper lands second Crufts title
    Norfolk Agility Star Crowned Winner At Crufts
    Gloucester Agility Star Crowned ABC Agility Novice Winner At Crufts
    Ashleigh and Pudsey Crowned Agility Winners at Crufts
    Shetland Sheepdog Stars Win at Agility Team Event at Crufts
    Young Person Crowned Groomer Of The Year At Crufts
    Southampton Agility Star Crowned Winner At Crufts
    Bilbo Baggins from Surrey Wins PAT Dog of the Year

    Tags: , ,
  • scissors
    March 11th, 2016Laura P (Editor)Crufts 2016

    James, a Gordon Setter and owner David Alcorn from Fife, Scotland, won the grand final of the first ever Kennel Club Vulnerable British & Irish Breeds competition at Crufts this evening and then went on to win Best in Group for Gundog breeds qualifying them for a place in the Best in Show final on Sunday.

    David Alcorn and James (Sh Ch Lourdace Fulcrum JW), aged 5, won the Vulnerable British and Irish Breeds competition and Best in Group for Gundog breeds in front of a packed Genting Arena at the NEC in Birmingham.

    David commented on his magnificent evening: “This has been an incredible day, really fantastic. It’s been non-stop and James has never stopped performing. He loves the big ring and the atmosphere and he always rises to the challenge. Winning the Vulnerable British & Irish Breeds competition and then going back into the main arena for the Gundog Group is the stuff dreams are made of.”

    VIDEO:
    Vulnerable Native Breeds Competition
    Group Judging and Presentation

    Alexander Gordon, 4th Duke of Gordon, is credited with establishing the breed we now know as the Gordon Setter.  Some records show the early version of the Gordon Setter was first recorded as long ago as the sixteenth century.

    Gordon Setter numbers decreased during the first half of the 20th Century, as the large shooting estates went into decline. In 1923 only 54 Setters were registered with the Kennel Club. During this period the Gordon Setter was rarely seen outside Scotland. By the end of the Second World War the Gordon was becoming more popular as a family pet rather than a working gundog. However, in 2015 only 234 Gordon Setters were registered with the Kennel Club and it is therefore considered to be a vulnerable breed.

    The Kennel Club launched the new competition to raise awareness of these breeds and to recognise those who are dedicated to their survival and prosperity.

    James and David will return to the Genting Arena at the NEC in Birmingham for the final of the 125th Anniversary of Crufts. People around Britain and the world will be watching to see which dog is crowned Best in Show as the final is shown live on Channel 4 and is streamed on the official Crufts YouTube Channel.

    Caroline Kisko, Kennel Club Secretary said: “Congratulations to James and his owner David on this fantastic achievement. To win two major competitions is an incredible achievement. James is doing a fantastic job of promoting the breed on the world’s largest stage and we wish him all every success for Best in Show.”

    The Reserve prize for the Vulnerable Native Breeds competition went to the Cardigan Corgi Ch Joseter Mr Blobby. 3rd was the Glenn of Imaal Ch Romainville Billy Whizz and 4th was the Field Spaniel Ch Elgert R’Anna.

    The Reserve prize for the Gundog Group went to the Chesapeake Bay Retriever SH CH ARNAC BAY EXE. 3rd was the Lagotto Romagnolo IT/NL/SLO/BE/FIN/SE/VDH/LUX CH GLESKA GOODY-GOODY and 4th was the Flatcoat Retriever CH/SEU(U)CH/NOU CH CASTLEROCK SIMPLY MAGIC.

    Tags: , ,
  • scissors
    March 4th, 2016Laura P (Editor)Crufts 2016

    Twenty six vulnerable dog breeds are heading to Crufts to take part in the Kennel Club Vulnerable British & Irish Breeds competition final, which is the first of its kind.

    Sponsored by pet food maker Eukanuba, and supported by Our Dogs newspaper, the Kennel Club launched the new competition for dog show exhibitors who show Vulnerable British & Irish breeds, to raise awareness of these breeds and to recognise those who are dedicated to their survival and prosperity.

    The competition, which was open to all vulnerable breeds competing at Open and Championship Shows, enabled dogs that are on the Kennel Club’s vulnerable breeds list to collect points over the course of the year for awards won at dog shows.

    The top scoring dogs from each breed have been invited to compete at Crufts 2016 and the inaugural final will take place on Friday 11th March at 6.10pm in the main arena.

    Former Kennel Club chairman Ronnie Irving will judge the first ever final of the Kennel Club Vulnerable British & Irish Breeds competition.

    Heading to the Crufts final are the following vulnerable breeds and their owners:

    BLOODHOUND
    DEFENDER OD HADIHO POTOKA AT HOUNDSEEKER (IMP CZE)
    Owned MISS E BURNSIDE & MR R MANLEY

    DEERHOUND
    Ch. FOXCLIFFE CLASSIC LIBERTY FREEDOM AT BEARDSWOOD (IMP USA)
    Owned by DR S HELPS, MRS C DOVE & DR R DOVE

    OTTERHOUND
    Ch. TECKELGARTH MAXIMUS
    Owned by MISS M LEREGO & MR S & MRS A SMITH & MISS E SMITH

    COLLIE (SMOOTH)
    Ch. FOXEARTH FLINTAB
    Owned by MR T & MRS B HAYWARD

    LANCASHIRE HEELER
    FOXTHYME BACK TO BLACK JW
    Owned by MRS N & MISS E BEACH

    WELSH CORGI (CARDIGAN)
    Ch. JOSETTER MR BLOBBY
    Owned by MR P CLIFTON

    WELSH CORGI (PEMBROKE)
    CHILILABOMWE FLAMING KATIE JW Sh.CM
    Owned by MR D J & MRS JE ASHBRIDGE

    BULL TERRIER (MINIATURE)
    ANGELS WARRIORS TINY FOREVER Sh.CM
    OWNED by MRS L GLASS

    DANDIE DINMONT TERRIER
    CLOVERWOOD DUCHESS MAY
    Owned by MRS E JACKA SLATER

    FOX TERRIER(SMOOTH)
    ZETAMAZ MARCEL MARCEAU AVEC LLYUNAMILL JW Sh.CM
    Owned by MRS R TURLEY

    GLEN OF IMAAL TERRIER
    Ch. ROMAINVILLE BILLY WHIZZ
    Owned by MRS K A GEORGE & MISS N C SULLIVAN

    KERRY BLUE TERRIER
    LEMRACDREAM RAPHAEL
    Owned by MS C CLARKE O’NEILL

    LAKELAND TERRIER
    BRINDLEFIELD MR BOJANGLES
    Owned by Mr N Riley

    MANCHESTER TERRIER
    Ch. FELFREE ROCKET
    Owned by MRS J & MISS G FERGUSON

    NORWICH TERRIER
    Ch. KREATIN HIDDEN EXTRA Sh.CM
    Owned by MRS C HITCHEN

    SEALYHAM TERRIER
    Ch. POLROSE PARKER PLUS ORNELLA Sh.CM
    Owned by MR L & MRS D BETTIS

    SKYE TERRIER
    Ch. BRAKEMILL BARNUM
    Owned by MRS J CURTIS

    ENGLISH TOY TERRIER
    Ch. WITCHSTONE CHINA GIRL FOR POSHPINS
    Owned by MR LEONARD, MR ROSS & MISS FROST

    KING CHARLES SPANIEL
    Ch. BALDRAGON SHE DEMANDS JW
    Owned by MRS C ROBINSON

    GORDON SETTER
    Sh Ch. LOURDACE FULCRUM JW
    Owned by MR D ALCORN, MR D CROWTHER, MRS J BADDLEY & MISS F SWAN

    IRISH RED & WHITE SETTER
    Sh Ch. ALANEA SUMMER COTTAGE Sh.CM
    Owned by MRS A TATTERSALL

    RETRIEVER (CURLY COATED)
    KAGEMUSHA TOKYO JOE JW Sh.CM
    Owned by MRS G MAY

    SPANIEL (CLUMBER)
    Sh Ch. TWEEDSMUIR DAMBUSTER JW
    Owned by MR P M & MRS H D MONAGHAN

    SPANIEL (FIELD)
    Ch. ELGERT R’ANNA JW
    Owned by MS G OSBORN

    SPANIEL (IRISH WATER)
    Sh Ch. CUBOGLACH PETITE WAVE
    Owned by MR M L FORD

    SPANIEL (SUSSEX)
    YORKHAM FRED BEAR FROM CHABROUILLE Sh.CM
    Owned by MR G J & MRS L A NESBITT

    Caroline Kisko, Kennel Club Secretary, said: “The Kennel Club’s list of vulnerable breeds includes some of the nation’s oldest dog breeds that have played an important role in this country’s history.

    “We are thankful to those dedicated and passionate owners who use their knowledge, care and expertise to ensure that these breeds continue to be a part of our society and we have launched this competition to give them the recognition and prestige that they deserve.”

    For more information on the Kennel Club Vulnerable British & Irish Breeds competition, please visit

    Tags: , ,
  • scissors
    February 7th, 2016Laura P (Editor)Articles

    …Whilst the Bedlington Terrier, Irish Terrier and English Setter are in decline, according to Kennel Club statistics released ahead of Crufts.

    The Queen’s favourite breed of dog, the Pembroke Welsh Corgi, and the Old English Sheepdog have experienced a surge in popularity in 2015 and are no longer considered to be at risk of dying out, according to Kennel Club breed registration statistics.

    The native British breeds were once at risk of disappearing from streets and parks around the UK after numbers fell so low that they were put on the Kennel Club’s ‘Vulnerable Native Breeds’ and ‘At Watch’ lists.

    The latest figures have been released ahead of Crufts, which showcases Britain’s vulnerable native breeds, and gives dog lovers the chance to meet the breeds to find out why they are worth saving.

    Crufts entry figures

    In 2014, the Pembroke Welsh Corgi was considered vulnerable, for the first time in the breed’s history, with only 274 puppy registrations. The breed has since had a 34 per cent increase in registrations from 2014 to 2015 and has moved from the Vulnerable Native Breed list to the At Watch list.

    The Old English Sheepdog, which was popularised by the television adverts for Dulux paint, has also seen a boost in numbers, up by 22 per cent from 405 puppy registrations in 2014 to 495 in 2015, meaning that it is no longer included in the At Watch list.

    Whilst these two breeds are experiencing a revival, things are not looking good for the Bedlington Terrier, as the breed is now on the At Watch list for the first time in the breed’s history after registrations dropped to 395 new pups in 2015.

    In addition to the Bedlington Terrier, the English Setter and Irish Terrier are now officially on the Kennel Club Vulnerable Native Breeds list, which includes those native dog breeds with fewer than 300 puppy registrations annually, meaning they fall below the minimum number needed to ensure that a breed’s population is sustainable.

    In total there are 29 breeds on the Vulnerable Native Breeds list, including the Skye Terrier, Kerry Blue Terrier, Sussex Spaniel and Field Spaniel. The Otterhound has the lowest registrations with only 34 registrations in total for 2015.

    There are seven breeds on the At Watch list, because they number between 300 and 450 registrations a year, including the Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier and the Bearded Collie.

    To put the registration figures for these breeds into perspective, the most popular breed in the UK, the Labrador Retriever, had 32,507 puppies registered in 2015.

    Caroline Kisko, Kennel Club Secretary, said: “Whilst it is good news for the Pembroke Welsh Corgi and Old English Sheepdog, we are concerned that the English Setter and Irish Terrier are dropping in numbers and the Bedlington Terrier is now included on the At Watch list for the first time.

    “Vulnerable native breeds are dog breeds originating in the UK and Ireland which have been identified by the Kennel Club as having annual registration numbers of 300 puppies or fewer. We compile the list in order to raise awareness of some of our oldest and historically best loved breeds of dog, which are struggling to compete with newer breeds that are more fashionable.

    “Crufts is coming up in March and this is a great opportunity for people to discover the 216 breeds recognised in this country, as currently half of all dogs registered in the UK are from the top ten breeds, with the other lesser known breeds sadly trailing far behind.”

    Vulnerable Native Breeds

     20112012201320142015Avg.
    Otterhound383742223435
    Skye Terrier444217634342
    Sussex Spaniel527455674358
    Field Spaniel464729704648
    Irish Red & White Setter11989821026491
    Curly Coated Retriever6271118776679
    Bloodhound505051747760
    English Toy Terrier951261159478102
    Smooth Collie758882337871
    Glen of Imaal Terrier675755747967
    Lancashire Heeler9810410313281104
    Dandie Dinmont Terrier9812010514488111
    Sealyham Terrier6376689711383
    Cardigan Welsh Corgi10894102118124109
    Kerry Blue Terrier212210169172131179
    Irish Water Spaniel10114810188132114
    Norwich Terrier158170194166147167
    Smooth Fox Terrier13794122142148129
    King Charles Spaniel180217161142149170
    Mastiff173140139124159147
    Lakeland Terrier247208221176173205
    Miniature Bull Terrier 216192161189183189
    Manchester Terrier152124198187192171
    Clumber Spaniel235151247217214213
    Gordon Setter245252273250234251
    Deerhound237260236234267247
    English Setter234314326332289299
    Irish Terrier277306362371290321
    Irish Wolfhound321302322282293304
    Old English Sheepdog401
    429461 405 495 438

    At Watch Breeds

     20112012201320142015Avg.
    Bearded Collie547480552371346459
    Welsh Springer Spaniel396348328315363350
    Pembroke Welsh Corgi371333328118366303
    Welsh Terrier415352447392389399
    Bedlington Terrier558506482462395481
    Parson Russell Terrier539562499395407480
    Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier433455372404423417

    Pembroke Corgis and Old English Sheepdogs are officially no longer endangered – Metro
    Famous and endangered breeds of dog are making a come-back – Express
    Corgis’ right royal revival – Daily Mail

    Tags: ,
  • scissors
    February 2nd, 2016Laura P (Editor)Crufts, Crufts 2015, Crufts 2016

    VNB

    Breed20162015
    Total:44354377
    Bloodhound2515
    Bull Terrier (Miniature)8577
    Collie (Smooth)5856
    Dandie Dinmont Terrier5956
    Deerhound101103
    English Setter200170
    English Toy Terrier 5864
    Fox Terrier (Smooth)6673
    Glen of Imaal Terrier4230
    Gordon Setter192208
    Irish Red & White Setter7886
    Irish Terrier5647
    Irish Wolfhound162149
    Kerry Blue Terrier5164
    King Charles Spaniel125108
    Lakeland Terrier4541
    Lancashire Heeler8689
    Manchester Terrier6657
    Mastiff6658
    Norwich Terrier5140
    Old English Sheepdog133111
    Otterhound3232
    Retriever (Curly Coated)7673
    Sealyham Terrier3338
    Skye Terrier5657
    Spaniel (Clumber)7087
    Spaniel (Field)5453
    Spaniel (Irish Water)3036
    Spaniel (Sussex)5257
    Welsh Corgi (Cardigan)9183
    Welsh Corgi (Pembroke)120144
    Tags: , ,
  • scissors
    March 1st, 2015Laura P (Editor)Articles

    Last week, 52 Dandie Dinmont Terriers and their human enthusiasts gathered in Selkirk on the Scottish Borders to participate in a one of a kind event. They were there to celebrate the 200th anniversary of the publication of Sir Walter Scott’s novel Guy Mannering, the book which introduced the Dandie Dinmont to the world.

    Three Scottish mansions vital to the history and development of the breed opened their doors so the breed’s heritage could be celebrated over three days; Abbotsford, Bowhill and The Haining. The event has attracted significant media coverage, which we have attempted to collate for posterity below.

    Dog WorldDandie Dinmont enthusiasts mark anniversary of Sir Walter Scott book

    The TelegraphDesperate fight to stop Dandies disappearing

    BBC (w video) – Rare Dandie Dinmont terriers celebrated

    Aberdeen Press & JournalPrepare yourself for cuteness: 50 Scottish terriers return to ancestral roots

    The Southern Reporter – Endangered breed comes home to Selkirk

    Scotland Now – Pack of 50 Dandie Dinmonts Terriers return to Sir Walter Scott’s home

    Irish Examiner – Secret origin of rare terriers revealed on 200th anniversary of Sir Walter Scott novel

    Selkirk Weekend Advertiser – The Haining welcomes £13,000 Dandie Dinmonts art donation

    Herald Scotland – Dandie Dinmont breed returns to Borders home in fight for survival

    ITV (w video)Dandie Dinmonts descend on the Borders

    BT – Rare terriers return to their ancestral home

    PA/Press Association Images

    Want to learn more about the Dandie Dinmont? Visit their Discover Dogs stand or come find them in Hall 2, Ring 77 at Crufts 2015.

    Tags: ,
  • scissors
    February 23rd, 2015Laura P (Editor)Crufts 2015, Show Tails

    Meet Bindi the Smooth Collie; the first of our 2015 ShowTails participants.

    BindiBindi (Seanua Sans Souci) is entered in the Obreedience competition and will be handled by her owner, Sophie Harrison. (In fact, they’ll be competing against a 2014 ShowTails star, Kheva the Pyrenean Sheepdog, so now we’re conflicted as to who to cheer for!) This is the first time either Sophie or Bindi have competed at Crufts and they are hoping that their nerves don’t get the better of them.  Both of them have previously competed in Rally and Agility, but never in front of such large crowds.

    Stage fright aside, Sophie tells us that she is looking forward to promoting this little known breed to such a wide audience. Smooth Collies are one of the British Vulnerable Native Breeds, with just 33 puppies registered in 2014. “Smooths get so little publicity and are so vulnerable; it would be lovely to promote them. They make fantastic family pets and are versatile enough to turn their hands to a variety of disciplines,” she says.

    Bindi is living proof of this fact; she’s clicker trained, gained all her Good Citizen awards before she was 13 months old, works as a registered PAT dog and raised £6,500 for charity last year by walking the 102 mile Cotswold Way in a week.

    At home, Sophie describes her as easy to live with, though friends have nicknamed her “Princess” due to her fastidious ways. “She’s the dog who walks around puddles and refuses to take treats from strangers, though her passion for rolling in fox poo is hardly princess-like!”  Bindi shares her home with a German Shepherd, a Schipperke and three very bossy cats.

    Sophie, who has lived in both the UK and Australia, was attracted to this unusual breed for one of the reasons which it is so often overlooked: the Smooth coat. They may lack the glamour of the Rough Collie appearance, but they’re certainly less work! “I wanted a dog that would be intelligent and athletic, good natured and social, with a low maintenance coat,” she says.  Health and temperament was a priority when picking a breeder, and Sophie prepared for 2 years before adding Bindi to the family. Bindi loved to carry things in her mouth, even as a tiny puppy, which was a desirable trait in a potential Obedience competitor and the reason why Sophie picked her out of the litter. “I wanted a dog who would want a job to do.”

    Hopefully Bindi will be able to do the importent job of representing her rare breed at the world’s biggest dog show. “I hope that the scale of the event won’t intimidate her, and that we are both able to enjoy our day,” says Sophie.

    She and Bindi will be competing in the Obedience ring on the Saturday, and we will of course let you know how they get on. In the meantime, please join us in wishing them (and the rest of the Smooth Collie team) the best of luck.  

    Photo credit: The Kennel Club

    Photo credit: The Kennel Club

     

    Tags: , , , , , ,
  • scissors
    February 17th, 2015Laura P (Editor)Articles

    On February 24th, 75 Dandie Dinmont Terrier enthusiasts from 8 different countries, together with 50 dogs of this rare breed, will be joining Sir Walter Scott experts and VIP guests, at his former home – Abbotsford, near Melrose in the Scottish Borders to celebrate an important anniversary – 200 years since the publication of the novel – which through its immense success, inadvertently created the world’s first celebrity dog.

    200 years ago, Sir Walter Scott’s introduced us to this adorable breed in his second historical novel, Guy Mannering which, became an unprecedented publishing success, selling out its first edition in just 24 hours.  It was in this book, that the character ‘Dandie Dinmont’ was first mentioned, described as a local farmer who always appeared with his unique Mustard and Pepper Terriers, the character ‘Dandie Dinmont’ and his Terriers became celebrities overnight and following the instant success of the book, royalty, nobility, and the rich and the famous flocked to the Scottish Borders in search of “Dandie Dinmont’s Terriers” and a breed was born!

    Sadly the fortunes of this most engaging and historic of breeds has declined so much in recent times that the UK only produces about 100 puppies a year whilst only around 300 are born annually world-wide and the Kennel Club have listed it as being a “Vulnerable Native Breed”

    But Dandie Dinmont Terrier enthusiasts are a dedicated bunch and for three days, building up to this unique bicentenary, international breed enthusiasts of the endearing little Terrier, will gather in Selkirk in the Scottish Borders area to pay tribute to the origins of the breed and to draw attention to its current fight for survival.

    During the three days, the group will visit three historic houses that have all played an important part in the creation of the modern day Dandie Dinmont Terrier – Abbotsford, the historic home of Sir Walter Scott, that will privately open its doors, out of season, to welcome the loyal enthusiasts;   Bowhill, the seat of The Duke and Duchess of Buccleuch, (The Duke is also Patron of the Abbotsford Trust) who will welcome the breed home to the Borders; and The Haining, Selkirk – a Palladian mansion now in the hands of a Charitable Trust where the father of the current day breed is recorded to have been born.   More than 50 Dandie Dinmont Terriers will also attend, which believed to be the largest ever informal gathering of these little dogs in Scotland.

    Although the breed has existed since the 1700’s, it became the first type of Terrier to be given a specific breed name, it has played it part in the foundation of several other breeds including the Bedlington and Sealyham Terriers and to this day remains the only breed of dog to be named after a character from fiction.

    Paul Keevil, UK Coordinator of the celebrations said: “We feel privileged that, in 1815 Sir Walter Scott brought the Dandie Dinmont Terrier to prominence, and today 200 years later, we are extracting his help once again to create awareness of this lovely little dog and hopefully, save it from possible extinction.”

    He added, Abbotsford is now one of the Scotland’s most vibrant tourist attractions and we are most grateful to the team at the Abbotsford Trust for embracing the spirit of our celebratory visits, and opening up for us and our Terriers in the off season, specifically so we could bring the Dandie Dinmont Terrier back home to its roots in the Border Counties of Scotland.  We also thank the Duke and Duchess of Buccleuch, at Bowhill, and The Trustees of The Haining in Selkirk for their kind support in highlighting the current plight of the breed.”

    Tags:
  • scissors
    February 15th, 2015Laura P (Editor)Articles

    In a bid to help the survival of the breed, a group of 75 Dandie Dinmont Terrier enthusiasts from 8 different countries, along with 50 dogs of this rare breed, will be joining Sir Walter Scott fans on 24th February, 2015, at his former home – Abbotsford House, near Selkirk in the Scottish Borders, to celebrate the 200th anniversary of the publication of Sir Walter Scott’s historical novel, Guy Mannering – the book that first introduced the Terriers to the world.

    The novel was an unprecedented success, selling out its first edition in just 24 hours, and it was in this book, that the Dandie Dinmont Terrier first rose to fame.  Described as a local farmer who always appeared with his unique Mustard and Pepper Terriers, the character called “Dandie Dinmont” and his Terriers became celebrities and following the instant success of the book at that time, Royalty, nobility, and the rich and the famous flocked to the Scottish Borders in search of “Dandie Dinmont’s Terriers” and a breed was born!

    Sadly the fortunes of this most engaging of breeds has declined so much in recent times that for the last 10 years The Kennel Club has listed the Dandie Dinmont as a “Vulnerable Native Breed”.  Britain produces about 100 puppies a year whilst only around 300 are born annually world-wide.

    Now, to save this unique breed, as Sir Walter did 200 years before, they must once again draw the attention of the world.  Where better to do it than at the very house that helped create this canine icon?

    Paul Keevil, UK Coordinator of the celebrations said: “200 years ago Sir Walter Scott brought the Dandie Dinmont Terrier to prominence, and today 200 years later, we are extracting his help once again to create awareness of this lovely little dog and hopefully, save it from possible extinction.”

    He added, “We are grateful to the Duke and Duchess of Buccleuch, at Bowhill, The Trustees of The Haining and the team at Abbotsford House for embracing our celebratory visits, and opening up in off season, specifically so we could bring the Dandie Dinmont Terrier back to its roots.”

    Dandie Dinmonts have a dedicated band of international followers and for three days, building up to their unique bicentenary, the enthusiasts for this endearing little terrier, will gather in Selkirk in the Scottish Borders area of Scotland to pay tribute to the origins  of the breed and to draw attention to its current fight for survival.

    During the three days, the group will visit three historic houses that are known to have played their part in the creation of the modern day Dandie Dinmont Terrier.  Bowhill, the seat of The Duke and Duchess of Buccleuch; The Haining, Selkirk – a Palladian mansion now in the hands of a Charitable Trust; and Abbotsford House, the historic home of Sir Walter Scott, will privately open their doors to welcome the enthusiasts.  More than 50 Dandie Dinmont Terriers will also attend, believed to be the largest ever informal gathering of these little dogs in Scotland.

    Although the breed has existed since the 1700’s, it became the first type of Terrier to be given a specific breed name and to this day remains the only breed of dog to be named after a character from fiction.

    Tags:
  • « Older Entries